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Offline Lee Borgersen

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Bout copper-nickel mining
« on: August 16, 2019, 11:45:01 PM »
  :reporter; Duluth News Tribune

Let's have honest conversations about copper-nickel mining :happy1:


Written By: DeanDeBeltz | Aug 16th 2019 - 8am.




 

 :coffee: ....
As people gather for the Wild Waters Music Fest in Duluth’s BayfrontFestival Park today, there will be much conversation about what needs to bedone to protect the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. As Twin MetalsMinnesota’s proposed mine plan moves through the regulatory process, those ofus who work in mining will be an important part of those conversations — notonly because we, too, care deeply about the Boundary Waters but because we arecommitted to the health of the communities of Northeastern Minnesota, whereour common future lives.


The Iron Range we know today was built on both mining and the wilderness.The forests of northern Minnesota have been home to mines and loggingoperations, outfitters and outdoor adventurers continuously for more than 130years. Those uses have coexisted, and, in fact, the people who worked themines have been among the most enthusiastic defenders of the wilderness wherethey live.

Twin Metals intends to build a mine that respects those values.


The Duluth Mineral Complex is one of the richest stores of copper, nickel,platinum-group metals, and cobalt in the United States. This is importantbecause everybody uses these metals, and, as climate change compels us to moveto low-carbon green technologies, the demand for these minerals continues toincrease.

Anybody who takes a selfie on their smartphone at the Wild Waters MusicFest or who drives there in a car is a user of copper, nickel, and a host ofother minerals that are in the Duluth Complex. Wind turbines, solar cells,batteries in electric vehicles, and catalytic converters all require theseminerals.

 :popcorn: ...
We need the kinds of minerals that are in the Duluth Complex. Theseminerals will be mined — either in a place like Minnesota that respects workerand environmental safety or in a place that does not. Those of us who usecopper, nickel, and the other metals should require the kind of oversight overtheir acquisition that our robust regulatory system and our culture demand.

Twin Metals is aware that we must operate in a way that protects ourwaters. Protection of our natural resources is why we will be proposing to usethe best-in-class environmentally friendly technologies to support ouroperation. :bow:

As an underground mine, our operation will occupy a small area on thesurface. We will be able to go thousands of feet below the surface andsurgically target ore containing the critical metals. Half of the unused rockfrom the mine will be backfilled with cement deep in the mine to minimizesurface disturbance.

In July, Twin Metals announced plans to store the remainder of the tailings — crushed rock which remains after the minerals are removed — in lined,dry-stack mounds on a site near the mine rather than conventional storage.This eliminates any risk of a dam failure, and extensive tests on our materialshow the tailings involved will be non-acid-generating.

As part of a 2018 online forum about copper-nickel mining run by thenonpartisan Citizens League, Kevin Lee, a staff attorney for the MinnesotaCenter for Environmental Advocacy, said, “I would go so far as to say that(dry stacking) would address the vast ajority of the concerns that we have forthese facilities.”'

Part of saving the Boundary Waters is ensuring an economic future for thepeople who live in the surrounding region. The main streets of Ely and Babbittshow that tourism alone cannot sustain a city. The jobs the Twin Metals minewill bring give Range towns the opportunity to thrive once again whilecontinuing to serve as a gateway to the wilderness treasure that is theBoundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness.

We are going to have public conversations over the next few years about thefuture of mining in Northeastern Minnesota. We hope these conversations focuson how we get what we need to sustain the green economy and to supportMinnesotans while protecting the home that we love.


Dean DeBeltz is director of operations and safety for Twin Metals Minnesota. He is based in Ely.



As people gather for the Wild Waters Music Fest in Duluth’s Bayfront Festival Park today, there will be much conversation about what needs to be done to protect the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. As Twin Metals Minnesota’s proposed mine plan moves through the regulatory process, those of us who work in mining will be an important part of those conversations — not only because we, too, care deeply about the Boundary Waters but because we are committed to the health of the communities of Northeastern Minnesota, where our common future lives.














« Last Edit: August 17, 2019, 12:00:37 AM by Lee Borgersen »
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Offline Lee Borgersen

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Re: Bout copper-nickel mining
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2019, 01:13:18 PM »
  :reporter; Counterpoint: Transparency, PolyMet foes demand. If only they'd noticed 14 years of it.


By Nancy McReidy (of Ely, Minn., is president of Conservationists with Common Sense.)
Nancy goes by da name of... "Bdub" here on MNO :happy1:


Public feedback was sought as early as 2005. Guess it doesn't matter when the last word is always "no."

 

As I have stated many times before, I have followed PolyMet for Conservationists with Common Sense (CWCS) since 2004. I have attended community readiness meetings, open houses, presentations and hearings and have learned about PolyMet’s process, environmental safeguards and financial assurance, which would be updated annually.

In those early days, few if any activists opposed to copper/nickel mining attended the PolyMet meetings. Only in the last few years have they been speaking against the permitting process.

A public scoping meeting on PolyMet was held as early as June 29, 2005, in Hoyt Lakes. In 2010, hearings were held on Dec. 9 in Aurora and on Dec. 10 in Blaine. In 2014, hearings again were held in Aurora on Jan. 22, in Duluth on Jan. 16 and in St. Paul on Jan. 28. Most recently, hearings were held in Aurora in 2018 on Feb. 7 and in Duluth on Feb. 8. There may have been other PolyMet hearings I have missed.of Ely, Minn., is president of Conservationists with Common Sense.[/b]


Where were Tom Berkelman, Arne Carlson and Janet Entzel (“PolyMet proposal: Let the sunshine in,” Aug. 14)? Did they attend any of those public hearings? I know many of Minnesota’s other political leaders who signed the recent letter to Gov. Tim Walz supporting PolyMet attended and spoke at those hearings.

The main argument against copper/nickel mining is that it might, may or could pollute area lakes, rivers and streams.

Industrial agriculture is, in actual fact, the biggest polluter of Minnesota lakes, rivers and streams, but we don’t stop all farming. We realize food production is a necessity, just as mining our natural resources is. We regulate farming to make it better. That is what our state agencies have done with mining. PolyMet has passed all the permitting requirements set before it.

And just as robotics has taken over much of the ag/farming industry, maybe in the future robotics will be a big part of the mining industry in northeastern Minnesota as well. But there still are jobs in maintaining those robots. And those may be union jobs. It will be up to the workers to decide to unionize, not the company.


CWCS has asked the many anti-mining groups to coming to the table with PolyMet to assure they will mine safely. But, they rather sue and delay  :doah: the future of Minnesota’s next generation of mining, depriving people of good paying jobs that will help sustain our schools, hospitals and communities. They fail to realize that mining on School Trust Lands will generate revenue for all Minnesota schools. They ignore the closing of another store and another family moving out of town.

 

What was really sad was when, at a legislative meeting in Ely last year, newly elected Rep. Dave Lislegard, DFL-Aurora, asked, “If a company follows the process, meets or exceeds state and federal standards, would you support the project?”

Steve Piragis, a supporter of Northeastern Minnesotans for Wilderness and Save the Boundary Waters, answered, “No.”


Stop by and visit us at......

http://www.cwcs.org

Nancy McReady,  :bow:
« Last Edit: August 19, 2019, 01:42:03 PM by Lee Borgersen »
Proud Member of the CWCS.
http://www.cwcs.org

Member of Walleyes For Tomorrow.
www.walleyesfortomorrow.org

              Many BWCA Reports
http://leeslakegenevaguideservice.com/boundry_%2712.htm

If you help someone when they're in trouble, they will remember you when they're in trouble again

 

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