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Author Topic: Alphalfa?  (Read 309 times)

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Offline Boar

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what time of the year is best to plant alphafa for fall hunt?
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Offline roony

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Two years ago.

Offline Dotch

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Can't speak from a deer hunting perspective boar but you basically have two windows of opportunity. Now, in early spring, and starting in late July to mid-August are your best bets for getting something attractive to deer, at least in our latitude. Roony's right about established alfalfa being best. They hammered my hay fields heaviest in years 2 & 3. The amount of deer crap out there was amazing when I checked the stands. Now the orchardgrass has taken over they still like it but not like they did.
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Offline deadeye

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I agree with roony and dotch it does take a couple years to establish alphafa.  Problem is it takes a bit of care and usually dies out in 3-5 years.  Especially in a neglected food plot.  I would go with winter rye if you are looking to hunt it in the fall.  Put half the plot in winter rye and half in turnips and you are good to go.  Probably plant in late August or early September. 
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Offline roony

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Turnips would be good. How about a patch of beets? Deer go absolutely nuts over beets. You'd have to fence them in until close to season. Beets will turn a docile creature into an uncontrollable savage. Tillage radishes might be another good choice.
« Last Edit: April 04/14/21, 01:06:19 PM by roony »

Offline Steve-o

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Turnips would be good. How about a patch of beets? Deer go absolutely nuts over beets. You'd have to fence them in until close to season. Beets will turn a docile creature into an uncontrollable savage. Tillage radishes might be another good choice.


 

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