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Author Topic: Maintaining trails  (Read 651 times)

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Offline Cooperman

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Maintaining trails
« on: August 04, 2020, 09:03:12 AM »
Maybe this is a question for JB or deadeye. I have 40 acres mostly wooded with trails through most of it. I mow the grass on the trails with a brush mower. The problem I have is every year the width of the paths gets smaller with saplings and bushes growing. My question is, what is the best way to cut this back and widen the trails? I tried using my Bobcat with a land plane, but that just makes a mess. How do you guys maintain the width of your trails?

Offline Jerkbiat

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Re: Maintaining trails
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2020, 09:25:26 AM »
 I have a brush hog for my ASV that does most of the mowing. But when the trees really start leaning in the fastest and easiest way we have found is the good old chainsaw works the best. one person cutting and another tossing brush.
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Offline markn

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Re: Maintaining trails
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2020, 09:45:15 AM »
We use a Stihl pole saw and Stihl trimmer with a brush blade on it. One person on each side cutting and one person behind them throwing the cut stuff out into the woods. They'll take brush up to 1 1/2" to 2". Plus I have a DR brush mower that I'll swing out to one side and pull it behind my wheeler. Good luck.  :happy1:
mm

Offline Cooperman

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Re: Maintaining trails
« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2020, 09:44:38 AM »
Thanks Guys, I think Iím going to buy a heavy duty Stihl brush cutter.
Markn, which blade for your Stihl do you think works better, the saw blade or the 3 point blade
« Last Edit: August 05, 2020, 11:12:57 AM by Cooperman »

Offline markn

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Re: Maintaining trails
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2020, 11:58:44 AM »
 Both are good, I think we use the three point more. You have to swing the trimmer into the brush abit with the three point, but it doesn't want to "kick back" as much as the saw blade. My boys are usally running the Stihls, I like the pole saw when I do use them and besides I'm usally the fat guy on the four wheeler driving along behine them or pulling the DR mower. Good luck and have fun.  :happy1: :happy1:
mm

Online deadeye

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Re: Maintaining trails
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2020, 08:58:37 AM »
Cooperman,
What type of "brush" mower are you using.  Seems to me if you use a brush mower you shouldn't have a problem with saplings as they should be cut and usually don't return.  I have the hitch off set a bit to allow the mower to track off to one side which helps a lot to prevent the issue you described.  Also as a bonus you have a lot less brush smacking you in the face because you can stay farther away from the edges.   :laugh:



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Offline oldbuck47

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Re: Maintaining trails
« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2020, 02:22:37 PM »
Leave saplings that are far enough out of the road as they will grow and shade out the brush later on.  Saplings are easiest removed with chainsaw and a helper or two. Our biggest problem is the hazel brush and willow which seem to like to grow to the opening every year.. After spraying the food plots I turn the sprayer nozzle 90degrees and spray a brush killer on the hazel brush with good results.
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Online LPS

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Re: Maintaining trails
« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2020, 05:59:13 PM »
Cut everything you can with your mowers.  Otherwise you will have to use your chainsaws in a few years.  The mowers are easier!

Online deadeye

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Re: Maintaining trails
« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2020, 09:26:13 PM »
Good advice there LPS
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Offline Boar

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Re: Maintaining trails
« Reply #9 on: August 11, 2020, 08:01:40 AM »
Thanks Guys, I think Iím going to buy a heavy duty Stihl brush cutter.
Markn, which blade for your Stihl do you think works better, the saw blade or the 3 point blade
i use the saw blade on my stihl. works aweskme!
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Offline Cooperman

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Re: Maintaining trails
« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2020, 09:52:57 AM »
Cooperman,
What type of "brush" mower are you using.  Seems to me if you use a brush mower you shouldn't have a problem with saplings as they should be cut and usually don't return.  I have the hitch off set a bit to allow the mower to track off to one side which helps a lot to prevent the issue you described.  Also as a bonus you have a lot less brush smacking you in the face because you can stay farther away from the edges.   :laugh:

I have a rotary brush mower (pull behind) the problem is the only tractor I have available is a John Deere 4115 and Iím afraid my PTO is not tough enough to handle bramble and saplings. It works fine on the tall grass. I do have an Allis Chalmers wd45 I could use, but Iím having trouble with the Hold position.
Iíve been looking at the Stihl FS131 brush cutter. I guess the lesson learned is once you get it cleared, stay on top of it.
Thanks all
« Last Edit: August 11, 2020, 12:00:27 PM by Cooperman »

 

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