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Author Topic: Fencelines  (Read 186251 times)

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Online glenn57

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That wild parsnips kinda looks like dill???
2015 deer slayer!!!!!!!!!!

Offline Dotch

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The flower and head does, yes, but the plant looks like a parsnip.

https://www.mda.state.mn.us/plants/pestmanagement/weedcontrol/noxiouslist/wildparsnip

Time itself is bought and sold, the spreading fear of growing old contains a thousand foolish games that we play. (Neil Young)

Offline LPS

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Was going to look it up to verify and that is what it is.  Thanks for posting Dotch.  These are only a foot tall and I think there are 6 of them. 

Offline Steve-o

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And the insidious thing about the toxin, once it gets into your skin, it can reactivate years later with exposure to sunlight.

Online glenn57

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there seemsto be areas up north with lotz of it. i know we have some in the ditch where we turn in to the cabin road!!!!!!!!!1
2015 deer slayer!!!!!!!!!!

Offline Dotch

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Lately I'm learnin' that so many yearnings are never to be

The scurs rain dancing practice paid off and with the Weather Eye predicting rainfall, it was a slam dunk. Are we due for more precip or are we back to waiting our turn again? Starting Wednesday, sunny with highs in the low 80ís with lows in the upper 50ís. Thursday, mostly sunny with a slight chance of an evening shower or thunderstorm. Highs in the mid-70ís with lows in the upper 50ís. Partly sunny on Friday with a modest chance of rain. Highs in the mid-70ís with lows in the low 60ís. Saturday, partly sunny with highs in the low 80ís and lows in the low 60ís. Partly sunny on Sunday with a slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Highs in the upper 70ís with lows in the low 60ís. Monday, mostly sunny with a modest chance of showers and thunderstorms. Highs in the upper 70ís with lows in the low 60ís. Mostly sunny Tuesday with highs in the upper 70ís with lows in the upper 50ís. The Full Moon for the month is on the 11th. On the a5th, we dip below 14 hours of daylight for the first time since April 26th. The normal high for August 15th is 79 and the normal low is 59. The scurs are on hiatus from dancing and will spend evenings on their blankie, watching the Perseid Meteor showers from August 9th Ė 13th.
 
August 11th ushers in the Full Moon for the month and is generally known as the Full Sturgeon Moon. This was the month the fishing tribes were able to catch these large fish in the Great Lakes as well as other large bodies of water. This would exclude the Le Sueur River and Boot Creek. It is also sometimes called the Red Moon for the hazy conditions causing to the moon to be red when it rises. Other names include the Green Corn Moon or the Grain Moon. The Ojibwe called it the Full Berry Moon as blueberries and huckleberries were ripe during this month. The Sioux knew it as the Moon when Cherries turn Black or the Moon when Geese shed their Feathers. At the ranch, it's known as the Full String Bean Moon as the greed pods occupy much of the refrigerator and counter space.
 
This past week marked a major tipping point in our growing season as we received some of the most timely yet gentle rain of the growing season. After the rain back in July that was truly amazing, we were suddenly back in the market for more. Indeed, when the forecast was calling for rain over the weekend I was in the ďbelieve it when I see itĒ camp. Too many times weíve seen significant precipitation forecast several days in advance only to have our hopes dashed by a much-diminished amount the closer we get to it occurring. Not this time. 1Ē Ė 2+Ē was what was forecast by the NWS, they stuck with it and thatís about what most got. Is it enough to finish the crop? Possibly, with some timely, slight additional precip and of course depending on what the temperatures do. That has been one of the unique things about this growing season. Sure, itís been warm, but the warm stretches have been of relatively short duration, allowing us to make the most of what has sometimes been touch and go precipitation-wise.
 
As mentioned above, the string beans at the ranch have gone crazy. Every 3 Ė 4 days, one can count on a gallon bag of string beans per row and there are four rows. After the July rains they built a tremendous factory with which to produce pods. Theyíre planted in 30Ē rows and the rows have been closed for quite some time. It used to be that sweet corn provided a benchmark for field corn yields. Iím not so sure these beans wonít have some correlation to soybean yields as well. Both crops look tremendous. Tomatoes are coming and the first BLT of the season was consumed at the ranch this past week. It was delicious and tasted like another one. Anthracnose has slowed the cucumbers somewhat, but they seem to have shrugged it off somewhat, surprising me with another dozen large specimens Monday night.
 
Weed control was looking good in the garden up until this last rain. Suddenly the tiny pigweed and purslane sprang to life, creating an annoyance that will need to be dealt with harshly. The sheep will likely come into play. Some of the weeds can be hoed or pulled and tossed over the fence. Itís become routine when the ewes see me in the garden, they come over to investigate as there are likely to be weeds and/or vegetables heading their way. It is almost gross to watch them eat the juicy purslane. This weed seems to be on the increase not only in gardens but is becoming more common in farm fields. It apparently figured out the Round Up Ready system, being capable of germinating later in the season like waterhemp. It does well especially on headlands and in open areas of the soybean canopy. It also has very tiny seeds, capable of germinating from shallow soil depths with scant precipitation. Unlike waterhemp, itís not terribly competitive unless it becomes very thick. While I prided myself on my moisture conserving efforts by using only light hoeing in the garden, the purslane found a way around it. The garden was nearly weed free two weeks ago. Now it needs to dry up some so I can get after it again.
 
Another Freeborn Co. Fair is in the books. With Mrs. Cheviot gone to help man Floral Hall there, I was left to my own devices. My devices included things like hoes, sprayers, rakes, buckets and bags. In between and after my toils, there was always the issue of what to eat. Fortunately there is the Auntie Mar Mar factor. As luck would have it, there was a lot of overflow from her baking entries at the fair so they were there on the counter for the eating. Funny how when you know itís there, you tend to pick away at it more frequently. As of this writing there were only a few things rattling around in the bottom of the foil pan. Before I know it, itíll be gone. Maybe Mar Mar can be convinced to enter baked goods for the Steele Co. Fair. Guessing not.

See you next weekÖreal good then.
Time itself is bought and sold, the spreading fear of growing old contains a thousand foolish games that we play. (Neil Young)

Offline LPS

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Purslane.  Looked it up.  That is what I have a lot of in the garden this year.  I pull it up when watering. 

Offline Dotch

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Ya there were some a while back advocating eating purslane, touting its nutritional value & taste so I tried some one time. The sheep can keep eating it. Pretty sure it would make glenn's list... :puke:
Time itself is bought and sold, the spreading fear of growing old contains a thousand foolish games that we play. (Neil Young)

Offline mike89

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I read where it's poisonous and where it's edible!!    say what?????????????   no thanks!!!! 
a bad day of fishing is still better than a good day at work!!

Offline Dotch

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So get ready, so get ready

With Mother Nature putting her foot on the brakes suddenly, the scurs will need the Weather Eye to warm us up a tad. Will it work or will we continue on a slow descent into fall? Starting Wednesday, mostly sunny with a modest chance of a shower or thunderstorm. Highs in the upper 70ís with lows in the low 60ís. Thursday, mostly sunny becoming cloudy with a good chance of an evening shower or thunderstorm. Highs in the upper 70ís with lows in the low 60ís. Mostly cloudy on Friday with a good chance of rain. Highs in the low 70ís with lows in the upper 50ís. Saturday, partly sunny with a good chance of a forenoon shower. Highs in the low 70ís with lows in the upper 50ís. Mostly sunny on Sunday with a slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Highs in the low 70ís with lows in the upper 50ís. Monday, mostly sunny with a modest chance of showers and thunderstorms. Highs in the mid-70ís with lows in the upper 50ís. Partly sunny Tuesday with a modest chance of rain. Highs in the mid-70ís with lows in the mid-50ís. The normal high for August 23rd is 78 and the normal low is 58. The scurs are liking this sleeping weather although they like sleeping in any weather as long as the AC and heat work.
 
While itís nice of Mother Nature to keep topping us off on rainfall, there are starting to be some concerns expressed about the mid-September temperatures weíve been experiencing. Comfortable for humans but not moving some of the later maturing corn along as rapidly as desired. Much of it has reached R4, the dough stage, but there has been no denting seen even in the earlier maturing corn planted early. We likely will need the entire month of September for corn to make it to relative maturity. It may also mean that more dryer gas will be required to dry it down. Soybeans are also slowing down although most have reached mid-R5 stage. It will take another 7 Ė 10 days until they reach R6. The plants having reached full size and the season becoming shortened, once they reach R6, yield responses to soybean aphid treatment are difficult to come by. R6 stage is defined as the soybean plant having a pod containing a green seed that fills the pod cavity at one of the four uppermost nodes on the main stem with a fully developed leaf.

Soybean aphids have increased some over the past several weeks, but most fields remain well below the treatment threshold. There are plenty of beneficial insects on the prowl in and around the fields, helping to keep aphid populations in check. Most of these are not specific to soybean aphids but feed on aphids and other soft bodied insects or their eggs if they happen across them. While not evident from windshield scouting, they become noticeable from time to time especially when looking in multiple fields on a daily basis. Over the years, sometimes you have closer contact with these insects than youíd care for.

These insects include soldier beetles, a tan beetle about ĹĒ - ĺĒ long that presently can be found mating on sweetclover next to soybean fields. They are related to fireflies but lack their light producing organs. Syrphid flies, those pesky hover flies are actually the good guys whose larvae are voracious aphid feeders. Everyone is aware of ladybugs, especially those lovely multi-colored Asian lady beetles who after feeding on aphids in the summer, often enjoy the winter in peopleís homes. Lacewing larvae have been on the prowl after hatching from their eggs borne on little stalks attached to the plant. Theyíre capable of eating up to 200 aphids per week. Lacewings have a foul taste so would not advise eating them despite what some might think. There are also minute pirate bugs in some soybean fields although this past week, they seemed to be more common in the corn, pursuing bird-cherry oat aphids. Pirate bugs also taste bad from personal experience. Fortunately theyíre small.
 
Was pleasantly surprised to see bats flying over the ranch at dusk a few weeks back although Iím not sure where they came from. It has been a while since weíve seen any number of bats. Very possibly white-nose syndrome has taken its toll on them here as it has across much of the country. The caves near where I grew up were prime overwintering areas for them especially the little brown bats such as we had in our house. Reports of large die offs from this fungus were common, and the caves were closed to the public for a while until they were able to get protocol in place to prevent the spread of the disease. While not as abundant as they have been some summers, mosquitoes have shown up and itís comforting to see some of natureís best winged mosquito eaters back on patrol again.

For all of you allergy sufferers out there, I bring you sad tidings. Looking at giant ragweed recently, itís about to unleash a massive blast of pollen in the near future. In areas apparently it already has. Some of the common ragweed also appears to have already done so. While Iíve never been diagnosed with the allergy, I probably donít need to be. In heavy pollen production years when little rainfall occurs to knock the pollen out of the air, the symptoms are pretty much textbook. I generally canít wait until the pollen shed period is over or when the giant ragweed freezes. It has become one of my all-time least favorite weeds. Its aggressive nature and ability to reduce yields not to mention its allergy producing capabilities puts it on top of the list. Iíve come to enjoy making its life miserable while watching it wither and die.
 
Crop Tour is just around the corner again. As usual it means a lot of last-minute preparations at the ranch before I leave. Once I think Iíve accomplished that, I try to remember what I forgot and just hope it wasnít too critical in the overall scheme of things. I then switch gears and go into Crop Tour mode. The placement of easily accessible electrical outlets in hotel rooms on Crop Tour is puzzling sometimes. When thinking Iíd solved the problem last year by bringing a short two-pronged cord Iíd rescued from my Momís, I came to the sudden realization the power source for my confuser was three-pronged. Luckily the battery held up fairly well and I was able to stay close enough to an outlet, so it didnít matter. In anticipation of this yearís evening writing sessions, I purchased a short three-pronged cord so I can type in relative comfort after a long day in the field. This time by gum, Iím ready.

See you next weekÖreal good then.   
Time itself is bought and sold, the spreading fear of growing old contains a thousand foolish games that we play. (Neil Young)